Alicia Vikander Central

I have added some new scans of Alicia Vikander to the gallery.

Gallery Link:
SciFiNow (February 2018)


More new photos of Alicia Vikander have been added to the gallery.

Gallery Link:
‘Euphoria’ gala film premiere, Biograf Rigoletto


I have added some new movie stills of Alicia Vikander from her recent movies to the gallery.

Gallery Links:
Euphoria (2018) > Movie Stills
Euphoria (2018) > Posters
Submergence (2018) > Posters
Submergence (2018) > Movie Stills
Tulip Fever (2016) > Movie Stills


Some new photos of Alicia Vikander have been added to the gallery.

Gallery Links:
‘Skavlan’ TV show, Stockholm (January 31st, 2018)
Dinner Hosted by the British Ambassador


Swedish film star Alicia Vikander set up her own Swedish film production company out of frustration at the lack of female directors in Hollywood, she has told Swedish Television.
Vikander, who takes over this March as Lara Croft in the Tomb Raider franchise, said she had tired of the lip-service paid to gender equality in the US film industry.

“Everyone kept on talking about how great it was that I got to play ‘strong, complex female roles’,” she said in an interview with Swedish Television. “I’m so tired of hearing those words! At the same time, there’s not a single woman to work with.”

Vikander was said on a visit to her hometown of Gothenburg to visit the city’s film festival, where Euphoria, the first film produced by her company, Vikarious Productions, was screened as part of its Nordic Competition.

The film, which follows two sisters travelling by train towards a Swiss euthanasia clinic, was directed by Lisa Langseth, who also directed Vikander’s 2009 feature film debut Pure.

Vikander pointed out that when she had started out in film, all of the screen-writers and directors she had worked with had been women.

“I started working in Sweden and only worked with female directors and screenwriters, and then when I went abroad I never got to do that ever again, right up until now, when I got to work with Lisa again,” she said.

She said that she had never herself been sexually propositioned or mistreated by shamed US producer Harvey Weinstein, despite starring in Tulip Fever, which was produced by The Weinstein Company. Although the film was only released last year, it was shot in 2014.

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The world’s new Lara Croft talks about producing, always learning, acting as hard work, and muscling up for ‘Lara Croft,’ in a Göteborg Festival masterclass

“This job is basically hard work in many ways,” Alicia Vikander said Sunday on stage at Sweden’s Göteborg Festival. She has proved that in her still-brief career: During the last 10 years, the Swedish actress has played major roles in more than 30 feature and TV productions.

Vikander proved it again over the weekend at Göteborg where, as a guest of honor, she received a Nordic Honorary Dragon Award at Friday’s fest opening, then gave a masterclass on Sunday – having attended the Swedish premiere of her latest feature, director Lisa Langseth’s“Euphoria,” her third performance for Langseth.

This time round, Vikander and Eva Green play two sisters, seeking understanding after a conflictive relationship. “Euphoria” marks Vikander’s first film as a producer after, two years ago, she set up Vikarious Productions with her London-based agent Charles Collier, of Tavistock Wood.

“We plan to do another two in the next two years – currently we are considering a couple of projects, and I think I can be more specific in May,” Vikander explained on stage at Göteborg’s Stora Teatern, after the screening of ”Euphoria” in the festival’s Nordic Competition.

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The Swedish actress of The Danish Girl and the upcoming Tomb Raider reboot used the platform to talk about women in film.

She spoke of her experience making Swedish feature films “all with strong women”, including two with director Lisa Langseth – Vikander’s film debut Pure (2010) and Goteborg 2018 selection Euphoria, in which Vikander stars and also serves as a producer.

“It gave me the opportunity to experience a diversity that was meaningful for my personal development and it gave me inspiration as an artist. But it also made me realise something even greater. Strong women are alone – as women – on the big screen. The roles we play, we play against strong men.”

She realised this during the shoot for Tulip Fever, when she filmed a scene with Holliday Grainger and noticed that she hadn’t shared a scene with another female “for a very long time.”

“I did four leading roles in a row, and didn’t have a single scene together with another woman,” she recalled.

“But instead of getting frustrated, I told myself to focus. Focus on the inspiring and fresh dynamic I had experienced with my female co-star. Also realising, there and then, that I can be a part of a change. Not alone, but together we can do a little bit more. Together we can change everything we want to change.”

She praised the groups already affecting change. “MeToo, TimesUp and [Swedish movement] Tystnadtagning makes a difference,” she said.

“It’s not all about men versus women. In this world, this amazing world of film, it’s also about us, women to women. We have been separated. We’ve been made to compete. Forced to believe that we need to bushwhack our way forward and guard our positions. But something has happened. It’s like we suddenly realized that there is not room for only one girl.

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It is not all about men versus women – it is also about us, women to women,’ Vikander said at the Swedish festival’s opening ceremony

Friday’s opening ceremony of Sweden’s 41st Göteborg Film Festival belonged to local girl made good Alicia Vikander.

“I haven’t had the possibility to come home as much as I have wanted in the last few years; it means a lot to be on this stage tonight , and I have therefore made the decision to continue this speech in Swedish,” said Swedish international actress Alicia Vikander on Friday at Göteborg’s Draken cinema, where she received the Nordic Dragon Award at the opening ceremony of the festival.

Born and raised in Göteborg, Vikander went on to say that she had made “three-and-a-half films” with strong women, two directors, plus writers, producers and women actresses in the leading roles,

“It made me realize that strong women are alone, as women, on the big screen. The roles we play are against strong men. I’ve played four leading roles in a row, and didn’t have a single scene with another woman.”

Vikander’s reaction? “Instead of getting frustrated, I told myself to focus – that I can be part of a change. Not alone, but together with others, as in MeToo, TimesUp, Sweden’s Tystnadtagning ShoutOut. It is not all about men versus women, it is also about us, women to women. We have been separated and made to compete.”

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